Dementia research findings and my pitch for tai chi

Researchers list nine activities that can help prevent as much as 33% of the world’s current estimate of 47 million cases of dementia (expected to triple by 2050), including Alzheimer’s. Tai chi is a physical activity and mentally stimulating exercise, two factors that recent research suggests can prevent dementia in millions. In a recently published article (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/one-third-of-dementia-cases-could-be-prevented-alzheimers-report/), researchers list nine activities that can help prevent as much as 33% of the world’s Read More …

Easy things you can do to fit tai chi into a busy life

You’re so busy to take in the wonder, not even enough time to take a moment to mourn the loss of the precious time burning away. What do you do? Here are a few ideas. Tip #1—Where you do tai chi. Get away from where you do your business in order to do tai chi without interruptions. Tip #2—When to begin tai chi When you wake, even before you get out of Read More …

A way to think about flexibility in tai chi?

It’s not what you think. It’s not how far you can extend your elastic, connective tissue or how much you can stretch it and let it go like a rubber band. Although this is one way of looking at flexibility, there is another. And that is the ability to move parts of your body that you don’t normally move, or haven’t moved in a very long time. This is more in line Read More …

The irony in seeking silence in tai chi practice

Tai chi is getting in touch with your own silence. Your inner place of peace. “Quiet mind,” as the teacher says. Quiet, not inactive, or complacent. The irony is that the ultimate goal of tai chi is to see beyond one’s self. Not just to look inward and find silence, but to go outside of one’s self from a place of silence within. You could argue that you must first find silence Read More …