Who does tai chi?

What kind of person wants to learn tai chi? A person who: needs/wants more physical activity needs/wants more mental focus is healing from injury wants to do more than an occasional fitness class enjoys interacting with others in an educational setting wants to delve deeper in the study of the subject is looking for a practice that complements other activities is having health issues, such as autoimmune disease. is having balance issues. Read More …

New book offers novices and beyond activities, concepts for developing a tai chi practice

“At its core tai chi is a practice, a routine activity that you engage in, in order to improve and maintain specific kinds of movement for a multitude of results, such as for overall health and longevity.” This statement in my new book, Practicing Tai Chi: Ways to enrich learning for beginning and intermediate practitioners, offers ways to think about a tai chi practice and to learn a few techniques from tai chi Read More …

Adapt to change with tai chi

Tai chi is a tool for adapting to changing conditions. Change prevails wherever you look. The weather changes. The wind blows, doesn’t blow, blows hard, then is a breeze. The temperature is hot, cool, cold. It’s raining or it’s dry. Grass is green and moist, or brown and maybe tinder dry. A tree never stops growing. It’s always at some point of changing from a sprout to a tree. Even a desert Read More …

Tai chi and getting some energy back

It is said that we are born with a finite amount of energy and that is all we have to make it through life. As life progresses that supply of energy is depleted through living: events, act, thoughts, points of view. It takes energy to live. Less of our original life force becomes available to us as we age. It becomes stuck, tucked away, or wasted upon others. We can get much Read More …

Yep. Martial arts are (virtually) popular, but here’s the (real) thing

With the popularity of martial arts in the movies and in gaming, wouldn’t it be nice to know what the real thing is . . . . and actually do it . . . . with your body? And wouldn’t it be best to learn from the best? That’s what you get if you were introduced to Martial Arts masters like Xu Guo Ming. A 40-year-plus practitioner and teacher of a number Read More …

Tai chi as a strategy to relax

One of the first things you’re asked to do in tai chi is to relax. Not easy for many beginners, who seldom can relax on command. Actually, most of us forgot how, or even define what relaxing is for ourselves. Life is like that. Tai chi offers a strategy for relaxing. My own approach is two-fold: mind intention and physical activity, both based on tai chi principles with which I have become Read More …

Tai chi and alpine climbing similiarites

I was talking with an alpine climber friend the other day. He spent some time in Switzerland as a guide and teacher. Mountain climbing, at least the way he describes it, sounds very familiar to tai chi. He was describing to me some of the things he would say when interacting with clients or students. One of the things he said that resonated with me was that a big key to alpine Read More …

A conversation between teacher and learner

Here is a brief exchange over email between a DTC member and myself that reveals our thinking about a subject central to learning tai chi. I welcome questions and comments because it stimulates concrete conversation which serves as a knowledge-building activity. Background: I returned after 10 days training retreat and exposed practice partners to using different muscles to feel more connectivity. I had usually been focusing on using mind to move, but Read More …