Another attempt to give meaning to the term tai chi

A lot of people don’t know what tai chi is . . . . really is. We’ve all heard a bunch to stuff from different sources, but I think that the best way to know what tai chi is is to do it. I think more people would be more likely to do it if they understood a little more about. I’ve taken it upon myself to to write and talk about Read More …

Who does tai chi?

What kind of person wants to learn tai chi? A person who: needs/wants more physical activity needs/wants more mental focus is healing from injury wants to do more than an occasional fitness class enjoys interacting with others in an educational setting wants to delve deeper in the study of the subject is looking for a practice that complements other activities is having health issues, such as autoimmune disease. is having balance issues. Read More …

New George Xu video just out

George Xu Presents Elementary Exercises for Developing Internal Martial Skill: 14 Essential Everyday Moves (with English Subtitles) A film by Paul Tim Richard, 48 minutes I have been producing, or co-producing, taijiquan and internal martial arts videos since 2002; about 16 years. Master George Xu and Susan A. Matthews got me going and I’m still working with them. I’m happy to film, edit and distribute Master Xu’s knowledge (with his expressed permission, Read More …

Tai Chi Prompt: Know you central equilibrium

Know where your central equilibrium is. Move around it, up and down its length. Forward and back. Straight, strong, alive, flexible, always regenerating.

Tai chi and getting some energy back

It is said that we are born with a finite amount of energy and that is all we have to make it through life. As life progresses that supply of energy is depleted through living: events, act, thoughts, points of view. It takes energy to live. Less of our original life force becomes available to us as we age. It becomes stuck, tucked away, or wasted upon others. We can get much Read More …

Tai chi as a strategy to relax

One of the first things you’re asked to do in tai chi is to relax. Not easy for many beginners, who seldom can relax on command. Actually, most of us forgot how, or even define what relaxing is for ourselves. Life is like that. Tai chi offers a strategy for relaxing. My own approach is two-fold: mind intention and physical activity, both based on tai chi principles with which I have become Read More …

Article Forward: How practicing tai chi can help the heart

This article’s news is good reading, but I’m a little disheartened as tai chi teacher. But that’s okay. I still am forwarding it because it’s yet another documentation of people utilizing tai chi with measurable success to address challenges they have with their health. Composed by Alice Park for Time Health, it describes a tai chi program for heart-attack victims that demonstrated positive behavioral changes after practicing twice or three times a week Read More …

Tai chi and alpine climbing similiarites

I was talking with an alpine climber friend the other day. He spent some time in Switzerland as a guide and teacher. Mountain climbing, at least the way he describes it, sounds very familiar to tai chi. He was describing to me some of the things he would say when interacting with clients or students. One of the things he said that resonated with me was that a big key to alpine Read More …