ARTICLE: Research shows vagus nerve stimulation can help reduce inflammation

Of course, they are talking about implanting a device in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but why don’t they look into tai chi and qigong doing similar stimulation and results, especially since this article talks about deep breathing, meditation, and even Read More …

If mental state influence physical conditions, where does tai chi play a role?

If mental states affect physical conditions, and researchers don’t know how it happens, then how can the cause/effect relationship be proven? As Stephen Locke, MD, states in The Healer Within (1986), “‘Knowing’ that one’s state of mind influences one’s body Read More …

Dementia research findings and my pitch for tai chi

Researchers list nine activities that can help prevent as much as 33% of the world’s current estimate of 47 million cases of dementia (expected to triple by 2050), including Alzheimer’s. Tai chi is a physical activity and mentally stimulating exercise, Read More …

Tai chi: a little purpose in life

Seniors who believe they have a purpose in life may sleep better, researchers say. Give yourself a little purpose by adding tai chi to your daily routine. Findings from this study doesn’t talk about tai chi, but I believe it Read More …

Article: “The Millennial Obsession With Self-Care”

from NPR.com by Christianna Silva The content of this report resonates with the growth of millennials who do tai chi. I think, however, that they are not finding tai chi as easily as I wish they would. The article stresses Read More …

Why do Tai Chi and Qigong?

Beyond the immediate physical benefits that you can experience in just one or two one-hour practices, you can find all sorts of reasons for doing tai chi and qigong, probably one for every person who practices regularly. If you do Read More …