Knowing what you want to do in tai chi practice and doing it

One key to reaping the greatest benefits from tai chi is to develop a home practice. Practice is something you do regularly, which offers opportunities to refine and discover new things as you learn. I recently suggested working on releasing tension and not to clench or tighten joints, tendons and ligaments, as well as muscle, when moving. This may sound like a rule to apply to all of your efforts, but it’s Read More …

How much time to I spend doing tai chi?

People ask, “how much time do you spend doing tai chi? Everyday?” I’m troubled to answer, because time is not an issue, only that I practice. Less and less I have to look for the time. It’s more of a command. I know if I don’t heed it, I will pay a price. I am no longer willing to pay for ignoring it. Once I could ignore the call, but not now. Read More …

Tai Chi movement, qi and yin-yang equilibrium

The word Qi (pronounced “chee”) in Chinese refers to vital energy and is found everywhere in nature. The Chinese refer to Heaven Qi, Earth Qi, and Human Qi. In learning tai chi, when we talk about Qi, we often talk about Yin and Yang— two opposing, but complementary, forces that are seen in endless variations. Taijiquan and Qigong are activities that you could think of as exercises, or methods, for working towards Read More …

Tai chi and Aging: A story

Not long ago, a friend and I were talking about our ages and about growing old. My friend said that he could hurt himself just from bending over and tying his shoes. That’s how fragile his body seems to be getting. I was embarrassed to admit that I’ve tweaked a back muscle doing just that. In the past, if we had had that conversation, I might have gone along with a tacit Read More …

Change is easier for some than others

Tai chi is all about change on several levels. Change is easier for some than for others. How can you make it easier for yourself? In tai chi, you can pinpoint how. It’s a matter of simply moving differently from what you are accustomed to. Visualize the parts of the body and see them move. Feel them and how they move. Describe to yourself what they are doing as they move one Read More …

TAI CHI STRENGTHENS BALANCE

Gentle movements produce more exercise than you might think Excerpts: “According to research, taking tai chi in small groups for a dozen weeks two to three times a week reduces falls up to 55 percent.” “Instructor Brenda Michaelis likes tai chi because it works your entire body. ‘You don’t realize you’re exercising, and it’s good for your spirit as well as your body,’ she said.” READ THE REST HERE: http://www.theindependent.com/news/local/gentle-movements-produce-more-exercise-than-you-might-think/article_dd554912-91ac-11e6-bd24-176169d193be.html

Tai Chi and Concentration

Every person comes to tai chi with conditions, circumstances, and issues unique to them; but most of us share one issue in common—the ability, or inability, to concentrate singlemindedly on a specific point, or task, in the body. Sustained attention is not easy, especially when dealing with unfamiliar information. This relates to the subject of mindfulness and being present-in-the-moment with what we are doing right now. For me, the value of tai Read More …

All Change is Self-Change

“You want to change the world? Change yourself.” My Chinese martial arts teacher, George Xu, told me that once. Of course, I already knew that, but it’s always good to be reminded. You can’t get enough reminding, especially in the midst of living under the barrage that is this world in this time. Not that I think I can change the world, but I am interested in changing myself. I’ve read also Read More …