Watch for gaps in your practice

I’ve noticed that, while I received some basics in the beginning, much was skipped over and I’ve felt a gap in my learning progress that I became aware of some years ago. This was from a lack of organization in the presentation of information. The sequence of learning had gaps that I would have to fill in years later. I would have to practice regularly for a long enough time to discover Read More …

Standing in Wu Ji

Wu Ji is the first position in the form or before doing anything in Tai Chi or Qigong. The first thing to do is find your Zhong Ding, your central alignment. Your ears are over the shoulders, which are in line with the hips, which are in line with the knees and ankles and the “Bubbling Well” (Yongquan). You will probably have to bend the knees to get there and maybe tilt Read More …

Does “Quiet” in Tai Chi Mean Being Still?

People perceive being still for being quiet, but there is another way of understanding “quiet.” Trying to hold still is only one kind of quiet. It can lead to clenching and tension, pain, and poor balance, especially in beginners. That kind of tension can’t be held long. “Quiet-in-movement” offers better balance, less clenching, reduced or no pain, and much more. Quiet results from the mind letting the body move according to its Read More …

Tai Chi and Concentration

Every person comes to tai chi with conditions, circumstances, and issues unique to them; but most of us share one issue in common—the ability, or inability, to concentrate singlemindedly on a specific point, or task, in the body. Sustained attention is not easy, especially when dealing with unfamiliar information. This relates to the subject of mindfulness and being present-in-the-moment with what we are doing right now. For me, the value of tai Read More …