Article: “The Millennial Obsession With Self-Care”

from NPR.com by Christianna Silva The content of this report resonates with the growth of millennials who do tai chi. I think, however, that they are not finding tai chi as easily as I wish they would. The article stresses the role of the internet in promoting self-care among millennials, though self-care has been around forever. Tai chi is ultimately self-care that contrast with the consumer approach to self-care mentioned in the report. Many people buy products (self-care kits) or subscribe to a twitter bot to remind them to take care of themselves. Just do tai chi, I say. Quotes: In 2015, according to the Pew Research Center, more millennials reported making personal improvement commitments than Read More …

A emotion word dictionary

This is about emotion words for which no English equivalent exists. I like this quote from Dr. Lomas who has been researching these cool words and has built a “dictionary” of 1,000 words from all around the world and from diverse cultures. …especcially the final sentence, which reminds me of tai chi learning. “In our stream of consciousness – that wash of different sensations feelings and emotions – there’s so much to process that a lot passes us by,” Lomas says. “The feelings we have learned to recognise and label are the ones we notice – but there’s a lot more that we may not be aware of. And so I think if we are given Read More …

Question about changing directions in Wu Style Tai Chi Form

Sometimes, I get questions from learners that merit sharing. This question is about whether we should pivot on the heels or the balls of the feet when changing directions in the Wu form. QUESTION: When you turn doing Tai Chi, is it always on your heels? ANSWER: This is a good question. By “always,” do you mean outside of class or inside? I learned in Wu style training, of which two lineages exist, to turn on the heels … except when the teacher does something else, such as turning on the bubbling well. The point I try to convey in class is to cultivate enough control to do what you intend to do, such as pivoting Read More …

Tai chi as a practice to train the mind

Renown Zen master DT Suzuki writes in the introduction to the little book entitled Zen in the Art of Archery that describes something that I’ve discovered about tai chi. He writes that a significant feature of the practice of archery is not “… for utilitarian purposes only or for purely aesthetic enjoyments, but … meant to train the mind; indeed, to bring it into contact with the ultimate reality.” This is la raison d’etre for tai chi for me—to train the mind. Training the body is equally key to balancing the dynamics of yin and yang in motion, of course, but Master Suzuki touches on a very core notion of tai chi practice that takes a Read More …

We learn when new info presents itself

It’s not a sense of urgency, but rather a sense of need that establishes the pace of learning in tai chi. It takes time and patience. When you need something, it comes only as fast as it is possible …. often slower than we wish. We just have to go that speed as possibilities become available …. or as we become aware of them.

Slow movements of taiji and qigong

We move slowly in tai chi. Why so slow depends on the practitioner. A beginner goes slow because that is how they develop control and take time to listen to their inner being and realize that slow movements result from moving more artfully. At first you can measure your activity by moving slowly. Later you are more clear on what you want to direct the body to do internally. Ever-deeper views into the many levels of your being leads to unknown knowledge and ability. At first slow movements are a place to begin and use to guide yourself; then your focus moves to deeper details of movement. For example, from where the move initiates. What leads Read More …