Use it or lose it: Stopping exercise decreases brain blood flow

According to a recent study “people who stopped exercising for only 10 days showed a decrease in brain blood flow in brain regions that are important for maintaining brain health.” This doesn’t suggest you will lose cognitive ability, the article‘s authors write; but “in older people, exercise can help protect the hippocampus from shrinking” which is symptom of Alzheimer’s Disease. Here is the full article with references.  

Tai Chi and Social Wellness

I find that wellness-coaching complements tai chi practice in several ways. One thing that merges with my long-held thoughts on tai chi is how social connections can help make you healthier. Group tai chi is a social interaction and it’s so powerful because people are getting together and sharing an experience of learning. Joining a tai chi group is a way to expand your social network, and help you find others to Read More …

Tai chi and chronic disease

I collect statistics related to my wellness studies and want to share a few with you that I found recently. Tai chi is part of my wellness plan, along with nutrition awareness. Chronic diseases account for more than 75% of national health care costs, and for 7 out of 10 deaths. Many chronic diseases are preventable because they are related to lifestyle choices. For example, 2013 was the first year that more Read More …

What you learn in Teacher Tim’s tai chi class

The basics, including “single basic moves” to train for specific objectives, such as loosening, relaxing and strengthening joints, ligaments and tendons, which is an exclusive offering of the tai chi exercise system. Other forms of exercise tend to strain those sections of the body. Form … which is essentially postures and transitions. Great for memory improvement, balance, circulation, and lot more. Form is the culmination of basics training. Qigong … takes you Read More …

Five (maybe six) questions people (might) ask before deciding to learn tai chi

You have to learn tai chi to see its effects. It doesn’t seem easy to do, but it’s simpler than many people think. People make a choice to learn when they start tai chi. They understand it takes effort and commitment. They can see that much about it. I identified five (maybe six) basic questions you can ask if you’re thinking about doing tai chi. As a teacher, my answer is yes Read More …

Study Results: Tai Chi, Ailing Joints, and Balance

“The ancient Chinese martial art is a cheap, effective treatment for knee pain, says a new study by Tufts professor. . . . At the end of the 12 weeks, the tai chi and physical therapy groups reported equal improvement in pain and related health outcomes, effects that remained 52 weeks after the start of the study.”

Tai chi and MS Research

I’ve practiced with people with MS (as well as Parkinson’s) in the past and have seen them change in positive ways. Research in MS appears to be going in an optimistic direction, maybe even a cure or even prevention someday. But tai chi as far as I’m concern will always be a usefulĀ  and powerful tool. The article about this study shows how. By the way, check out the photo in this Read More …

Tai Chi Resembles Drugs, Aerobics in Blood Pressure Lowering

This article is fromĀ  Medscape Medical News. “‘The traditional Chinese discipline offers possibilities for older people who can’t or don’t want to exercise strenuously, said Linda Pescatello, PhD, from the University of Connecticut in Storrs.’” http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/864177