Standing in Wu Ji

Wu Ji is the first position in the form or before doing anything in Tai Chi or Qigong. The first thing to do is find your Zhong Ding, your central alignment. Your ears are over the shoulders, which are in line with the hips, which are in line with the knees and ankles and the “Bubbling Well” (Yongquan). You will probably have to bend the knees to get there and maybe tilt the pelvis. This physical alignment is only part of Wu Ji. A place to begin to train your attention. Next is to become aware of tension, clenching, torqued parts of your body. Release that tension if you can. Keep in mind that tai chi Read More …

Two strategies to help manage stress

I do tai chi and qigong as exercises to reduce stress. I find them effective because movement central to each can loosen up inertia and stagnation produced by various types of stress. Just sitting too long can produce physical stress, accompanied by poor lymph drainage and negative brain/hormone activity. Tai chi and qigong get you moving in beneficial ways. Stress is one of those conditions that predisposes you to illness, says Dr. Lissa Rankin, author of Mind Over Medicine, Scientific Proof That You Can Heal Yourself, published in 2014. In a TEDx talk, she covers a whole range of topics related to stress and how modern medicine has fallen short of addressing the cause of illness, Read More …