Refining and Single-Basic Exercises

Although single basics are repetitive, they are not repetitious, so to speak. You repeat a pattern, intent on refining, not on repeating it exactly the same way as before. Change is the key. “Changeability” as Master Xu puts it. How do you refine? Pick out a particular locus and focus your attention on how you move there. Focus on the move itself and how you might alter it—make it smoother, rounder, less Read More …

Notes from practicing “peng” and a stimulating conversation

I used to assume that we westerners prefer explanations as we learn tai chi. In contrast, in China, teachers might not explain anything at all. However, explanations, or descriptions, are not as defined culturally as an individual preference, I think. We learn by listening to explanations and by doing. We had a productive practice Saturday outdoors that, for me, revealed many things about this idea of learning and doing tai chi. To Read More …

Audio, The Goal of Tai Chi

Here is an audio clip of me describing the goal of tai chi from my perspective. Comments are welcome on the usefulness of audio clips on this blog. Thanks for listening.

The Tai Chi There and the Now

Tai chi learning is an incremental process that can’t be rushed. Of course, it helps to practice consistently with mindful attempts to recall what you were exposed to in class. Even though promoters often say tai chi is simple and easy, most beginners don’t practice at home between classes. If I could offer you a daily practice, I would in order to help you build a routine to incorporate in daily living. Read More …

Tai chi and hope

We may not notice that we change as we mature and age. We may wake one morning to discover that our bodies are not functioning as they once did. Tired and sluggish, aching and stiff, we push on against the natural inclination to just stop to rest. Really rest. But that could be the death of us, so we push on and try not think about it. Tai chi helps to develop Read More …