Tai Chi Prompt: Know you central equilibrium

Know where your central equilibrium is. Move around it, up and down its length. Forward and back. Straight, strong, alive, flexible, always regenerating.

Thoughts on Developing Your Home Tai Chi Practice Routine

I was recently asked about developing a routine for home practice. Most of us are probably used to being given a set of movements to do—one set for everyone. I take a different approach, suggesting that you choose a few moves from among the many that we do in class that appeal to you and remember them at home. While we share a lot in common, every person is different: different bodies, Read More …

What is “whole body moves as a single unit” and how to do it

“Whole body moves as  single unit” is one of the goals you want to achieve and refine in the practice of tai chi. One way to approach understanding what it is, is to become aware of parts that are not moving and more aware of parts that you are moving already. Usually, we rely on individual parts as substitutes for moving the total body. We reach with only an arm, or bend Read More …

Change is easier for some than others

Tai chi is all about change on several levels. Change is easier for some than for others. How can you make it easier for yourself? In tai chi, you can pinpoint how. It’s a matter of simply moving differently from what you are accustomed to. Visualize the parts of the body and see them move. Feel them and how they move. Describe to yourself what they are doing as they move one Read More …

Standing in Wu Ji

Wu Ji is the first position in the form or before doing anything in Tai Chi or Qigong. The first thing to do is find your Zhong Ding, your central alignment. Your ears are over the shoulders, which are in line with the hips, which are in line with the knees and ankles and the “Bubbling Well” (Yongquan). You will probably have to bend the knees to get there and maybe tilt Read More …

TAI CHI STRENGTHENS BALANCE

Gentle movements produce more exercise than you might think Excerpts: “According to research, taking tai chi in small groups for a dozen weeks two to three times a week reduces falls up to 55 percent.” “Instructor Brenda Michaelis likes tai chi because it works your entire body. ‘You don’t realize you’re exercising, and it’s good for your spirit as well as your body,’ she said.” READ THE REST HERE: http://www.theindependent.com/news/local/gentle-movements-produce-more-exercise-than-you-might-think/article_dd554912-91ac-11e6-bd24-176169d193be.html

All Change is Self-Change

“You want to change the world? Change yourself.” My Chinese martial arts teacher, George Xu, told me that once. Of course, I already knew that, but it’s always good to be reminded. You can’t get enough reminding, especially in the midst of living under the barrage that is this world in this time. Not that I think I can change the world, but I am interested in changing myself. I’ve read also Read More …

Two taiji concepts for a lifetime of practice

Talk to any master practitioners of tai chi and they will tell you that zhong ding and dantian are the two most important concepts in tai chi and Chinese internal martial arts. They are also the most basic. They are the two things you will work on for as long as you do tai chi. Hopefully, that will be a lifetime. It doesn’t take long to understand the concepts, just a lifetime Read More …